Understanding for Which Students and Classes a Socio-Ecological Aggression Prevention Program Works Best: Testing Individual Student and Class Level Moderators

Lisa Bardach, Takuya Yanagida, Petra Gradinger, Dagmar Strohmeier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

School-based aggression prevention programs may not be equally effective for all students and classes, depending on student and class characteristics. This study investigated moderators of a cluster randomized controlled socio-ecological aggression prevention program’s effectiveness (change from pretest to posttest, sample: 2,042 preadolescents, mean age = 11.7 years, SD = 0.09, 47.6% girls) and sustainability (change from posttest to follow-up test, sample: 659 preadolescents, mean age = 12.7 years, SD = 0.08, 47.9% girls). The program worked better in multicultural classes, as greater ethnic diversity strengthened the program’s effectiveness and sustainability. Moderating effects of a positive social class climate and higher baseline levels of aggressive behavior and victimization were also found. These results advance socio-ecological theorizing and can help develop more contextualized interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-243
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Keywords

  • Aggressive behavior, Victimization, Randomized controlled, Moderator, Effectiveness, Climate, Ethnic diversity
  • Bullying/prevention & control
  • Crime Victims
  • Students
  • Aggression
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Male
  • School Health Services
  • Child

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