Trust and Perceived Risk of Personal Information as Antecedents of Online Information Disclosure: Results from Three Countries

Horst Treiblmaier, Chong Sandy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Individuals have to disclose personal information in order to utilize the manifold options of the Internet. Online users frequently trade data for benefits (privacy calculus). Trust in both the Internet and the vendor has been identified as an important antecedent to disclosing personal information online. The authors introduce the perceived risk of disclosing specific data types as an additional factor in the field of study. The results from a survey in three countries (Austria, Australia, and Hong Kong) show that the perceived risk of disclosing personal information is a stronger stimulus for the intention to provide personal information than having trust in the Internet or in the online vendor. Several significant differences are found in the relationships between the perceived risk of disclosing personal information, trust, and the willingness to disclose personal information.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-94
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Global Information Management
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Keywords

  • E-Commerce
  • Information Disclosure
  • Internet Privacy
  • Personal Information
  • Privacy Calculus
  • Trust

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