The surface properties of nanocrystalline diamond and nanoparticulate diamond powder and their suitability as cell growth support surfaces

Thomas Lechleitner, Frederik Klauser, Thomas Seppi, Judith Lechner, Paul Jennings, Paul Perco, Bernd Mayer, Doris Steinmüller-Nethl, Johannes Preiner, Peter Hinterdorfer, Martin Hermann, Erminald Bertel, Kristian Pfaller, Walter Pfaller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films and nanoparticulate diamond powder (DP) are the two main representatives of diamond at the nanoscale. This study was designed to investigate the suitability of these biomaterials as cell growth supports and to determine surface characteristic properties best suited to cell attachment and proliferation. Surface topography, chemical termination and wetting properties of NCD- and DP-coated borosilicate glass substrates were correlated to attachment, proliferation and differentially regulated gene expression of human renal epithelial cells (HK-2 cell line) cultured on these surfaces. Hydrogen-terminated NCD (NCD-H) surfaces were shown to inhibit cell attachment, which indicates that the lack of functional polar groups prevents adherent cells from settling on a surface, whether nanostructured or not. In contrast to NCD-H, oxygen-terminated NCD (NCD-O) as well as DP surfaces demonstrated improved cell attachment, as compared to borosilicate glass, which is a commonly used material for cell growth supports. NCD-O not only revealed an increased cell attachment, but also a markedly increased proliferation rate. Finally, none of the investigated surface modifications appeared to cause adverse cellular reactions or markedly alter cellular phenotype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4275-4284
Number of pages10
JournalBiomaterials
Volume29
Issue number32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

Keywords

  • Cell adhesion
  • Cell proliferation
  • Cytotoxicity
  • Gene expression
  • Hydrophilicity
  • Surface treatment
  • Cell Line
  • Gene Expression
  • Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
  • Nanostructures/chemistry
  • Powders
  • Cell Proliferation
  • Humans
  • Crystallization
  • Glass
  • Cell Adhesion
  • Diamond/chemistry
  • Surface Properties
  • Microscopy, Atomic Force
  • Spectrum Analysis

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