The goal to be accepted by friends as underlying function of overt aggressive behaviour in immigrant adolescents

Dagmar Strohmeier, Hildegunn Fandrem, Elisabeth Stefanek, Christiane Spiel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated (1) to what extent the goal to be accepted by friends is an underlying function of overt aggressive behavior in adolescents, and (2) whether this function is more predictive than reactive aggression for overt aggressive behavior in first and second generation immigrants compared with natives. The sample comprised 339 native Austrians (51.6% girls), 126 first generation immigrants (48.4% girls), and 175second generation immigrants (54.3% girls) aged 14 to 19 (M=15.61). Data were collected via self-assessments. Multiple group latent means and covariance structures (MACS) models revealed that the goal to be accepted by friends was a stronger predictor than reactive aggression for overt aggressive behavior in first generation immigrants compared with second generation immigrants and natives. Furthermore, gender moderated these associations. The goal to be accepted by friends was a very strong predictor of overt aggressive behavior in first generation immigrant boys, but not in first generation immigrant girls. Results are discussed regarding the process of acculturation in first generation immigrant youth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-88
Number of pages9
JournalScandinavian Journal of Psychology
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

Keywords

  • Acceptance
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Immigrants
  • Instrumental aggression
  • Reactive aggression
  • Adolescent Behavior/ethnology
  • Friends
  • Humans
  • Self Report
  • Peer Group
  • Male
  • Aggression/psychology
  • Social Class
  • Young Adult
  • Acculturation
  • Adolescent
  • Sex Factors
  • Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology
  • Female
  • Social Distance
  • Interpersonal Relations
  • Psychological Distance

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