Situational Action Theory's principle of the conditional relevance of controls: Results from Slovenia

Gorazd Mesko, Helmut Hirtenlehner, Eva Bertok

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Situational Action Theory's principle of the conditional relevance of controls implies that controls only influence behavior when moral barriers have been overcome. The failure of the moral filter to exclude crime from the range of the perceived behavioral options can root both in low personal norm acceptance and in exposure to a crime-affirmative moral context. In detail it is assumed that deterrence only becomes relevant when personal morality is weak, and that self-control only becomes significant when the social setting provides deviant rules of behavior. Both hypotheses are tested with survey data from Ljubljana (Slovenia). The results are in line with the theoretical expectations, thus providing firm support for core assumptions of Situational Action Theory.

Translated title of the contributionSituational Action Theory's principle of the conditional relevance of controls: Results from Slovenia
Original languageGerman
Pages (from-to)297-317
Number of pages21
JournalMonatsschrift für Kriminologie und Strafrechtsreform
Volume98
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2015

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