Interaction of Basal Foliage Removal and Late-Season Fungicide Applications in Management of Hop Powdery Mildew

David Gent, Claudia Probst, Mark Nelson, Gary G Grove, Stephen Massie, Megan C Twomey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Canopy management is an important aspect of control of powdery mildew diseases and may influence the intensity of fungicide applications required to suppress disease. In hop, powdery mildew (caused by Podosphaera macularis) is most damaging to cones when infection occurs during bloom and the juvenile stages of cone development. Experiments were conducted over 3 years to evaluate whether fungicide applications could be ceased after the most susceptible stages of cone development (late July) without unduly affecting crop yield and quality when disease pressure was moderated with varying levels of basal foliage removal. In experimental plots of ‘Galena’ hop, the incidence of leaves with powdery mildew was similar whether fungicides were ceased in late July or made in late August. Disease levels on leaves were unaffected by the intensity of basal foliage removal, whereas the intensity of basal foliage removal interacted with the duration of fungicide applications to affect disease levels on cones. Similar experiments conducted in large plots of ‘Tomahawk’ hop in a commercial hop yard similarly found no significant impact on disease levels on leaves from either the duration of fungicide applications or intensity of basal foliage removal. In contrast, on cones, application of fungicides into August had a modest, suppressive effect on powdery mildew. There was also some evidence that the level of powdery mildew on cones associated with fungicide treatment was influenced by the intensity of basal foliage removal. When fungicide applications ceased in late July, there was a progressive decrease in the incidence of cones with powdery mildew with increasing intensity of basal foliage removal. Removing basal foliage two to three times allowed fungicide applications to be terminated in late July rather than late August without diminishing disease control on cones, yield, or cone quality factors. Thus, this study further establishes that fungicide applications made during the early stages of hop cone development have the strongest effect on suppression of powdery mildew on cones. The additive effect of fungicide applications targeted to the periods of greatest cone susceptibility and canopy management to reduce disease favorability may obviate the need for fungicide applications later in the season. This appears to be a viable strategy in mature hop yards of certain cultivars when disease pressure is not excessively high.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1153-1160
Number of pages8
JournalPlant Disease
Volume100
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

Keywords

  • Hopfen
  • hops
  • powdery mildew
  • Echter Mehltau
  • Fungizide
  • fungicide
  • Pflanzenschutz
  • disease control

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