Implicit attitudes toward smoking: How the smell of cigarettes influences responses of college-age smokers and nonsmokers

Sabine Glock, Carrie Kovacs, Dagmar Unz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The habit of smoking may have automatic behavioral components guided by implicit attitudes. Smokers' attitudes toward smoking should thus be less negative than nonsmokers', so that a salient smoking cue (smell) is able to activate positive aspects of these attitudes. An affective priming task was used to explore this hypothesis. Unexpectedly, smokers and nonsmokers showed equally negative implicit attitudes, irrespective of smell. Smokers exposed to the cigarette smell did, however, display generally slower responses than nonsmokers, suggesting attentional bias. This could have implications for smoking policies in contexts where attentional factors affect performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-641
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

Keywords

  • associative-propositional evaluation model
  • attentional bias
  • cigarette smell
  • implicit attitudes
  • smoking

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Implicit attitudes toward smoking: How the smell of cigarettes influences responses of college-age smokers and nonsmokers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this