How consumer impulsiveness moderates online trustworthiness evaluations: Neurophysiological insights.

Marco Hubert, Mirja Hubert, René Riedl, Peter Kenning

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingsConference contributionpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the emergence of new technologies, in particular the Internet, the opportunity for impulsive purchases have expanded enormously. In this research-in-progress, we report the current status of an fMRI-project in which we investigated differences between neural processes in the brains of impulsive and non-impulsive shoppers during the trustworthiness evaluation of online offers. Both our behavioral and fMRI data provide evidence that the impulsiveness of individuals can exert significant influence on the evaluation of online offers, and can potentially affect subsequent purchase behavior. We show that impulsive individuals evaluate trustworthy and untrustworthy offers differently than do non-impulsive individuals. With respect to brain activation, both experimental groups (i.e., impulsive, non-impulsive) exhibit similar neural activation tendencies, but differences exist in the magnitude of activation patterns in brain regions that are closely related to trust and decision making, such as the DLPFC, the insula cortex, and the caudate nucleus.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 35th International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS)
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event35th International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS) - Auckland, Australia
Duration: 14 Dec 201417 Dec 2014
http://archives.aisconferences.org/icis2014/

Conference

Conference35th International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS)
CountryAustralia
CityAuckland
Period14.12.201417.12.2014
Internet address

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Communication
  • Consumer behavior
  • Consumer impulsiveness
  • Electronic commerce
  • Empirical analysis
  • FMRI
  • Human behavior and IS
  • Trust
  • Trustworthiness

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