Forms of organisation of social care activities in the mirror of the mutual perception of professional and voluntary probation officers: Case study on the relationship between vocational and non-vocational staff in the social service sector

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Abstract

The current development of the social sector is marked by a transformation of basic conditions, which is expressed in terms of an increasing cost pressure and an enhancement of status and a structural change of voluntary work. This paper addresses the question which patterns of mutual perception professional and voluntary social workers develop under such circumstances. Considering the Austrian probation service as example the social climate between professional and voluntary social workers is analysed. The main finding is that the mentioned transformations do not necessarily generate a conflict between vocational and non-vocational staff. Although the tasks of professional and voluntary probation officers are partially overlapping they view themselves mutually as enrichment and supplement and not as rivals. The extent of individual experiences of acceptance and appreciation may be identified as a background factor for the cooperative climate. Self-experienced acceptance and appreciation inhibits negative attitudes towards the other group.

Translated title of the contributionForms of organisation of social care activities in the mirror of the mutual perception of professional and voluntary probation officers: Case study on the relationship between vocational and non-vocational staff in the social service sector
Original languageGerman
Pages (from-to)95-110
Number of pages16
JournalOsterreichische Zeitschrift fur Soziologie
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2004
Externally publishedYes

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