Depression in Groups of Bullies and Victims: Evidence for the Differential Importance of Peer Status, Reciprocal Friends, School Liking, Academic Self-Efficacy, School Motivation and Academic Achievement

Elisabeth Stefanek, Dagmar Strohmeier, Takuya Yanagida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goals of this study were (1) to identify groups of bullies and victims, (2) to investigate level differences in depression, peer relationships, and academic variables, and (3) to examine how peer relationships and academic variables were associated with depression in these groups. The sample comprised 1,451 students (48.6 girls) aged 10-15 years (M = 12.31). Applying Latent Profile Analysis five groups were identified: non-involved adolescents (74), bullies (9), moderate victims (11), severe victims (3), and bully-victims (3). Non-involved adolescents had lowest level of depression and highest level of school liking. Severe victims had fewest reciprocal friends and were perceived as most unpopular. Severe victims and bully-victims had highest level of depression and lowest levels of school liking. In non-involved adolescents, moderate victims, and in bully-victims academic variables, in bullies academic variables and peer relations, and in severe victims peer relations were related to depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-43
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Developmental Sciences
Volume11
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • academic variables
  • Bullying
  • latent profile analysis
  • peer relationships
  • victimization

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