Bullying and affiliation: A study of peer groups in native and immigrant adolescents in Norway

Hildegunn Fandrem, Sigrun K. Ertesvag, Dagmar Strohmeier, Erling Roland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study (1) investigated the extent to which native Norwegian and immigrant girls and boys bully others and (2) examined peer groups to find out with whom pupils affiliate with when bullying others. Furthermore, the study explored whether immigrant boys, more than native Norwegian boys, were carrying out bullying together with others. To identify bullies, self- assessments, nominations by co-bullies and nominations by victims were used. Social cognitive mapping (SCM) was used to identify peer groups. Peer groups were classified according to number of bullies and non-bullies in the group. The sample comprised 97 native Norwegian adolescents (55 girls, 42 boys) and 59 immigrant adolescents (34 girls, 25 boys) attending grades 8, 9 and 10. Configural frequency analyses showed that immigrant boys were less often identified as non-bullies but more often identified as bullies than expected by chance. On the contrary, immigrant girls were more often identified as non- bullies but less often identified as bullies than expected by chance. In addition, immigrant boys were overrepresented in bullying groups and immigrant girls were overrepresented in zero bullying groups. Furthermore, more immigrant boys than one would expect were bullying together with others, and more Norwegian girls that one would expect were bullying alone. Implications for bullying prevention programmes in schools are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-418
Number of pages18
JournalEuropean Journal of Developmental Psychology
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Affiliation
  • Bullying
  • Immigrants
  • Peer groups

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