Bigger is not always better: Display size, performance, and task load during peephole map navigation

Roman Rädle, Hans-Christian Jetter, Jens Müller, Harald Reiterer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingsConference contributionpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dynamic peephole navigation is an increasingly popular technique for navigating large information spaces such as maps. Users can view the map through handheld, spatially aware displays that serve as peepholes and navigate the map by moving these displays in physical space. We conducted a controlled experiment of peephole map navigation with 16 participants to better understand the effect of a peephole's size on users' map navigation behavior, navigation performance, and task load. Simulating different peephole sizes from 4″ (smartphone) up to 120″ (control condition), we confirmed that larger peepholes significantly improve learning speed, navigation speed, and reduce task load; however, this added benefit diminishes with growing sizes. Our data shows that a relatively small, tablet-sized peephole can serve as a "sweet spot" between peephole size and both user navigation performance and user task load.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2014
Subtitle of host publicationOne of a CHInd - Conference Proceedings, 32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages4127-4136
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781450324731
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2014 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: 26 Apr 20141 May 2014

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Conference

Conference32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2014
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period26.04.201401.05.2014

Keywords

  • Display size
  • Experimentation
  • Map navigation
  • Navigation performance
  • Peephole navigation
  • User study

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